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The Swinburne Institute 2014 Events

Swinburne Institute for Social Research seminars

To view a complete list of 2013 events, visit SISR 2013 Events

For more information about the events, please contact A/Prof Ellie Rennie on erennie@swin.edu.au or Teresa Calabria on tcalabria@swin.edu.au

To enquire about this event or subscribe to our seminar mailing list, please email isrevents@swin.edu.au.

Upcoming Seminars

Date:
Friday 15 August
Event type:
Seminar
Venue:
EN103
Time:
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Topic:
Introducing TrISMA: New computational methods and large datasets for Australian Social Media Research
Presenters:
Jean Burgess and Axel Bruns
Target Audience:
All welcome
Register:
Please RSVP to isrevents@swin.edu.au.
Brief Description:

For a range of reasons, social media research has been at the forefront of the current 'computational turn' in media, communication, and cultural studies. Digital methods applied to large datasets from digital media platforms are allowing new approaches to the dynamics of public communication at scale and in close to real time. At the same time and within the same disciplines, increasing critical and philosophical attention is being paid to the materiality - the architectures, algorithms, and interfaces - of these platforms. Alongside analogous trends in the digital humanities and digital sociology, these developments are leading to changes in the structural organisation of scholarly research activities, to new skills requirements for postgraduate students and research staff, as well as to a demand for more powerful infrastructure frameworks for gathering, processing, analysing, and visualising what is now known as ‘big data’.

The TrISMA ARC LIEF project (involving QUT, Swinburne, Deakin, and Curtin Universities as well as the National Library of Australia) is a two-year project to develop fundamental shared infrastructure for tracking and analysing public communication across a number of key social media platforms in Australia. It builds on preliminary methodological work at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, which has already resulted in considerable advances in the study of Twitter in Australia, and extends this work in depth, scale and diversity. It also requires and enables us to make significant contributions to thinking around the institutional arrangements, politics and ethics of large-scale research based on 'big data' from proprietary social media platforms.

This presentation outlines the emerging challenges for social media research in Australia, presents the current state of the field, and outlines the research agenda of the TrISMA project. In particular, we highlight the key practical, conceptual, methodological, and ethical issues which the project will need to address as it advances our current collective capabilities for conducting computationally-enabled social media research.

Jean Burgess (@jeanburgess) is an Associate Professor of Digital Media at Queensland University of Technology, where she is also Director of Research Training for the Creative Industries Faculty. Her research focuses on the cultures, politics, and methods for studying social and mobile media platforms. Her books include YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture (Polity Press, 2009), Studying Mobile Media: Cultural Technologies, Mobile Communication, and the iPhone (Routledge, 2012), A Companion to New Media Dynamics (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013), and Twitter and Society (Peter Lang, 2014).

Axel Bruns (@snurb_dot_info) is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow and Professor in the Creative Industries Faculty at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. He leads the QUT Social Media Research Group and is the author of Blogs, Wikipedia, Second Life and Beyond: From Production to Produsage (2008) and Gatewatching: Collaborative Online News Production (2005), and a co-editor of Twitter and Society (2014), A Companion to New Media Dynamics (2012) and Uses of Blogs (2006). His current work focusses on the study of user participation in social media spaces such as Twitter, especially in the context of acute events. View his research blog and the Mapping Online Publics website for more details on his research into social media.

Date:
Starts Friday 25 July 2014 (convenes monthly)
Event type:
Reading group
Venue:
ATC 910
Time:
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Topic:
Indigenous Studies Reading Group
Target Audience:
Swinburne staff and students researching in the field of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and international Indigenous studies.
Register:
Please RSVP to isrevents@swin.edu.au.
Brief Description:

The Swinburne Institute is hosting a university-wide reading group for all Swinburne staff and students researching in the field of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and international Indigenous studies.

Topics may include (but will not be restricted to) culture, technologies, design, history and social context.

The reading group will convene monthly, with the first meeting taking place on Friday 25 July, 1-2pm, ATC 910. This is an opportunity to share your own research, engage with ideas, and meet other researchers from across the university. All Welcome.

Date:
Wednesday 27 August 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Venue:
Library conference room
Time:
3:15pm - 6:15pm
Topic:
Democracy and Justice
Target Audience:
All welcome
Brief Description:
Five excellent presentations and lively discussion on a broad range of topics:
  • Nic Maclellan (Swinburne University) - Self-determination for New Caledonia
  • Kate McGregor (University of Melbourne) and Professor Bambang Purwanto (Gadja Mada University) - Indonesia under its new president
  • Jasmina Kijavcanin (Swinburne University) - Issues of historical justice in Serbia
  • Peter Robinson (Swinburne University) - Having feelings for your data
  • Sandy Gifford (Swinburne University) - Humanitarianism and refugee settlement
Date:
Friday 29 August 2014
Event type:
Seminar
Venue:
Penang Room, Level 3, Swinburne Library
Time:
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Topic:
Identity Research Network Seminar Sessions
Target Audience:
All welcome
Brief Description:

The Identity Research Network will be holding a series of seminars over the next few months in the lead up to its workshop in early December.

The IRN brings together researchers from a wide range of disciplines working on themes of identity. The purpose of these seminars is to create an informal environment for researchers to learn about each other's work and gain exposure to new ideas and develop new lines of research.

The sessions are intended to be exploratory and informal, with about 3-5 presentations by members of about 15 minutes. All welcome.

  • Friday 25 July - What is identity? How do we use identity in our research? Alex Stewart, Chris Agius, Sanjib Goswami and Karen Turner
  • Friday 29 August - Theoretical approaches to identity - Michaela Callaghan, John Cash and Lucy Nicholas
  • Friday 26 September - Empirical case studies - Hind Ghandour, Ricardo Armellei and Peter Robinson
  • Friday 31 October - Practice-led approaches to identity - Tim Moss, Dean Keep and Neil Thomas
  • Friday 28 November - New avenues and collaborations: Identifying research links and novel approaches and studies of identity - Lauren Gurrieri

Past seminars

Date:
Friday 25 July 2014
Event type:
Workshop
Time:
9:00am - 5:00pm
Topic:
Locative media research methods
Target Audience:
Postgraduate students and early career researchers
Brief Description:

Places are strictly limited. Applications are required.

This one-day workshop is designed for postgraduate students and early career researchers (ECRs). It features leading international locative media researchers, Christian Licoppe (Télécom ParisTech), Jordan Frith (University of North Texas), and Raz Schwartz (Cornell Tech). The workshop focuses on research methods issues and questions pertaining to the study of mobile and location-based media technologies. Some of the methodological areas the workshop will cover include digital ethnography, social media analysis and data visualisation, and the tensions between physical mobilities and digital connectivity.

The event is free, but numbers are limited. Applications are required. To apply, please send a short bio statement and a paragraph stating how the workshop is relevant to your present research to isrevents@swin.edu.au.

Date:
Wednesday 23 July 2014
Event type:
Research symposium
Venue:
EW 301 (Entry via Building EN Level 3)
Time:
8:30am - 5:00pm
Topic:
The social lives of locative media
Target Audience:
All welcome
Brief Description:

A free public one-day symposium. Places are strictly limited. Registration is required.

The Swinburne Institute for Social Research, Swinburne University of Technology is proud to present a one-day public symposium on locative mobile media, featuring leading international and Australian researchers.

Speakers and topics include:

Jason Farman (University of Maryland College Park): ‘Locative Media and the Poverty of the Screen’

Jordan Frith (University of North Texas): ‘Filter Bubbles and Physical Space: Examining the Social Consequences of Spatial Search’

Gerard Goggin (University of Sydney): ‘Disability and Locative Media’

Larissa Hjorth (RMIT University): ‘Visualising Ambient Play: Camera Phone Practices and Cartographies of Co-presence’

Christian Licoppe (Télécom Paristech): ‘Location Awareness and the Social-interactional Dynamics of Mobile Sexual Encounters between Strangers. The Uses of Grindr in the Gay Male Community.’

Ben Light (QUT): ‘Social Networking Sites and Geographies of Disconnection’

Kane Race (University of Sydney): ‘“Looking to Play?” Online Hook-up Devices in Gay Life’

Ingrid Richardson (Murdoch): ‘Medium and Mediation: Locative Mobile Media as Thing and Process’

Raz Schwartz (Cornell Tech): ‘The Social Media Pulse of the City’

Rowan Wilken (Swinburne University of Technology) &
Lee Humphreys (Cornell): ‘Social Media, Commercialisation, and the Control of Information: Foursquare and Small Business’ 

See the full program, speaker biographies and abstracts.

Date:
Friday 18 July 2014
Event type:
Seminar
Presenter:
Hassan Bashir
Venue:
EN214
Time:
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Topic:
Inter-cultural dialogues in a globalized world: (Re)assessing the case for a Comparative political theory in the West.
Target Audience:
All welcome
Register:
Please RSVP to isrevents@swin.edu.au
Brief Description:

Since its introduction, in the 1990s, Comparative political theory (CPT) has seen phenomenal growth as a subfield of political theory in North American universities. Comparative theorists believe that political theory may have originated as an academic discipline in the West but it is not coterminous with it. They argue that the ongoing wave of globalization has made it inevitable for political theorists to consciously understand and incorporate the manner in which the “political” is conceived in non-western contexts. To reach this end the comparativists frequently construct imaginary East-West dialogues with the ultimate objective of achieving a fusion of horizons between the East and the West.

This talk critically evaluates the usefulness of such an approach and argues that CPT’s objective, of finding a middle ground between euro-centrism and euro-denial, has the potential of introducing the likes of a Khunian paradigmatic shift within the academic discipline of political theory in the West. However, this is only possible if comparativists expand the scope of CPT to periods earlier than late modernity and detach it from the condition and the demands of the current wave of globalization.

Hassan Bashir is Associate Professor of Political Science at Texas A&M University at Qatar. He received his Ph.D. in political Science (Political Theory and International Relations) from Texas A&M, USA in 2008.

His research interests include inter-cultural political thought, role of non-state violent actors in International Relations and the moral dimensions of globalization. Bashir is the author of Europe and the Eastern Other: Comparative perspectives on Politics, Religion and Culture before the Enlightenment and co-editor of a volume Co-existing in a Globalized World: Key themes in Inter-professional Ethics.

His forthcoming publications include two co-edited volumes on moral aspects of globalization and an article on republicanism during the early American founding period in History of Political Thought. Bashir’s research has been funded through grants and industry sponsorships from the US National Science Foundation, Qatar National Research Fund, Texas A&M University and Qatar Petroleum. Bashir is a Fulbright fellow and has received the prestigious H.B. Earhart fellowship from the Earhart Foundation three times.

Date:
Monday 7 July 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Venue:
AGSE 210
Time:
3:00pm - 6:00pm
Topic:
Democracy and Justice
Target Audience:
All welcome
Brief Description:

Four excellent presentations and lively discussion on a broad range of topics:

Nigel Parsons (Massey University) - Biopolitics and Resistance in Palestinian East Jerusalem

Damir Mitric (La Trobe University) - Masculinity, Trauma and Loss in Post-War Bosnia: Reconstructing categories of Gender

Leonardo Pegoraro (University of Urbino) - Eugenics and Forced Sterilizations in North America: The plight of the Indigenous Peoples

Peter Mares (Swinburne University) - The Ethics of Temporary Migration: What’s time got to do with it

Date:
Friday 4 July 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Venue:
EN 214
Time:
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Topic:
Patriotism and US Public Opinion on Foreign Policy
Target Audience:
All welcome
Brief Description:

Patriotism is a potent political value. Since nations existed, political elites have sought to encourage and harness feelings of pride in national identity amongst populations to win support for revolutions and nation-building. Appeals to patriotism became associated with peace and war throughout the history of the United States of America. For example, in 1914 President Woodrow Wilson associated patriotism with support for American neutrality during the First World War: “Every man who really loves America will act and speak in the true spirit of neutrality”. More recently President George W. Bush associated patriotism with his War on Terror by signing the PATRIOT Act (Uniting (and) Strengthening America (by) Providing Appropriate Tools Required (to) Intercept (and) Obstruct Terrorism) into law on October 21st, 2001.

Karen Devine will discuss whether ordinary American citizens have espoused greater levels of patriotism in response to the 9/11 attacks, using survey data from 1981 to 2013. She will also examine whether there are any group-based differences (by party identification, gender and race) and changes detectable over time. Her research points to three main findings: (1) levels of pride in national identity are variable in relation US foreign policy events, (2) patriotism is a social construct (given variation by race) and a political device (given variation by party identification) and (3) because, as Martha C. Nussbaum pointed out, “the media portrayed the [9/11] disaster as a tragedy that happened to our nation”, discourses constructing foreign policy events as linked to the Nation are purposive given the associated political and policy outcomes.

About the presenter:
Karen Devine is a lecturer in International Relations at Dublin City University in Ireland. She has published widely on foreign policy and public opinion in Ireland and Europe in journals such as Cooperation and Conflict, International Political Science Review, Swiss Political Science Review, International Politics and Irish Political Studies. She is a former Chevening, Government of Ireland and Fulbright Scholar, recently returned from a year at Columbia University in the City of New York researching the relationship between patriotism and US foreign policy.
Date:
Wednesday 25 June 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Presenter:
Professor Emerita Diane Bell
Venue:
AGSE211
Time:
1:00pm - 2:30pm
Topic:
Economies of Knowledge and Standing Workshop
Target Audience:
All welcome
Brief Description:

This 1.5 hour workshop is designed to assist researchers working with various cultural groups, where the research process raises dilemmas of an ethical, practical or political nature. Esteemed anthropologist, Diane Bell, will lead the workshop with a discussion paper on the mismatch between oral and written cultures. In the paper, Professor Bell writes: 'When the protocols of an oral culture are confronted by a written culture, ruptures in the capacity of 'owners' to ensure their 'word' circulates according to their protocols are apt to be significantly undermined'.

Participants will be provided with a copy of the full paper in advance and will be asked to respond to the paper. Written responses (100-500 words) will be circulated to the group prior to the workshop. Participants are encouraged to share their own research experiences and dilemmas.

About the presenter:
Diane Bell is Professor Emerita of Anthropology at The George Washington University, DC, USA and Writer and Editor in Residence at Flinders University, South Australia. She now lives in Canberra where she continues to write, speak, strategise and advocate for a more just society: a concept that underwrites and unifies the various and varied facets of her feminist anthropological stance on life.
Other events by Diane Bell:
Book Launch of the new edition of Ngarrindjeri Wurruwarrin [PDF 746KB]
Venue: Readings Hawthorn, 701 Glenferrie Road Hawthorn
Date: Monday, 23 June 2014 6.00pm for 6.30pm
Date:
Tuesday 24 June 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Presenter:
Professor Emerita Diane Bell
Venue:
AGSE207
Time:
5:30pm - 7:00pm
Topic:
The legacy of lying and the politics of apology: Anthropology at the intersections of gender, race and class
Target Audience:
All welcome
Brief Description:
'Lies, lies, lies’ flared the Adelaide Advertiser banner headline in December 1995 as it confirmed what many Australians already knew: women were not to be believed; Indigenous cultures in the so-called ‘settled south’ were fabrications; museums were the trusted custodians of the past. A South Australian Royal Commission had found that a group of Ngarrindjeri women had deliberately fabricated beliefs about sites in the Hindmarsh Island, Goolwa, Murray Mouth region to thwart development. Turning the anthropological gaze on Australian society and the institutions that purport to ‘protect and conserve the past’, Diane Bell brings us up to date with post Hindmarsh Bridge Ngarrindjeri culture. The women have been vindicated, the State has apologised. However, the legacy lingers. How has the potent intertwining of gender, race and class inflected what can be known of Ngarrindjeri culture? Can self-authored accounts be trusted? What is the role of ‘engaged research’? Bell interrogates the well-established ‘tradition’ of contesting Ngarrindjeri culture, the limits of apology, the privileging of partial written records over the dynamism of oral cultures and the promised new page of post-Apology Australia history.

About the presenter:
Diane Bell is Professor Emerita of Anthropology at The George Washington University, DC, USA and Writer and Editor in Residence at Flinders University, South Australia. She now lives in Canberra where she continues to write, speak, strategise and advocate for a more just society: a concept that underwrites and unifies the various and varied facets of her feminist anthropological stance on life.
Other events by Diane Bell:
Book Launch of the new edition of Ngarrindjeri Wurruwarrin [PDF 746KB]
Venue: Readings Hawthorn, 701 Glenferrie Road Hawthorn
Date: Monday, 23 June 2014 6.00pm for 6.30pm
Date:
Tuesday 24 June 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Presenter:
Dr Matthew Rimmer (ANU), Angela Daly (Swinburne) and Darcy Allen (RMIT)
Venue:
EN 210
Time:
11:00am - 1:00pm
Topic:
Maker politics, culture and law
Target Audience:
All welcome
Brief Description:

This seminar will comprise of three presentations on the broad theme of 'Maker Culture'. Firstly there will be a presentation from guest speaker, Dr Matthew Rimmer of ANU College of Law and ARC Future Fellow, looking at the Maker Movement and their engagement with political processes in the US. Secondly, Angela Daly (SISR research fellow) and Darcy Allen (RMIT PhD candidate and SISR research assistant) will present the initial research output of the Swinburne 'Legal and Social Implications of 3D Printing' project, which examines the extent to which sharing practices are prevalent in the Thingiverse online user-generated content platform for 3D printing design files. Thirdly, Dr Amanda Scardamaglia (Swinburne FBE lecturer and SISR affiliated researcher) will explore some legal issues arising from 3D printing, specifically those affecting trademarks, passing off and consumer protection law, from the perspective of both intellectual property owners and the 3D printing community.

Date:
Friday 2 May 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Presenter:
Klaus Neumann and Annika Lems, Swinburne Institute for Social Research
Venue:
EW 302
Time:
1:00pm-2:00pm
Topic:
On Nostalgia

Target Audience:

All welcome.

Brief Description:

What do we mean when we talk about nostalgia? And where does the idea of nostalgia come from? In their paper, Annika Lems and Klaus Neumann will talk about a seventeenth-century Swiss doctor, soldiers and cowherds, and about migrants’ departures and returns.

About the presenter:

Annika Lems is an anthropologist and a filmmaker. Last year she was awarded a PhD for a thesis about the life stories of two Somali-Australians. She is an adjunct research fellow at the Swinburne Institute. Klaus Neumann is a trained historian with more than a passing interest in anthropology. He is a research professor at the Swinburne Institute.

Date:
Friday 14 February 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Presenter:
Professor Denise Meredyth, Executive Director, Humanities and Creative Arts, Australian Research Council
Venue:
AGSE 207
Time:
9:00am-10:30am
Topic:
ARC Current Developments and Trends

Target Audience:

All researchers are invited. The presentation will cover general ARC topics, with a particular focus on the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences disciplines.

Brief Description:

As one of Australia's premier funding bodies, the ARC plays a key role in providing funding for research projects; in the training of researchers and research career progression; and in setting national priorities for future funding.

About the presenter:

Professor Meredyth joined the ARC as Executive Director, Humanities and Creative Arts in late September 2013. Her presentation will cover topics of relevance to all seeking a deeper understanding of the workings of the ARC - such as trends in funding and factors affecting success rates; the future of program offerings and progress in grant processes improvement; as well as more directed trends in the humanities and social sciences disciplines.

Date:
Friday 7 February 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Presenter:
Dr Pete Seel, Colorado State University, USA
Venue:
ATC 422/423
Time:
1.00-2.00pm
Topic:
Digital Immortality: What happens to online user-generated content after the user's death?

Dr Pete Seel of Colorado State University will explore the concept of "digital immortality" and the development of technologies to create an online digital archive of personal thoughts, writings, photos, videos from birth to death that will likely outlive the author. It is now possible to use Facebook's "timeline" feature to create a simple version of this concept with photos, text and videos by uploading content from the user's prior life. If the user's descendants agree to keep the content online after their death, it may become a permanent historical record of their entire life from birth to death, as long as the host company stays in business. The implications for historians, genealogists, and the user's descendants may be significant.

Dr Seel will also provide a brief overview of policies of three social media companies concerning access to a deceased user's site by family and friends. It is now commonplace for a user's Facebook page to become a memorial site after their passing. Decisions to close the site by the deceased's family are at times contested by the subscriber's friends. Key related topics are: who controls access to a personal social media site after the user's death? Has legislation in the U.S. and other nations addressed the topic of a "digital estate" and how this might be defined? How do copyright laws and site terms-of-use policies apply?

Digital immortality will be the subject of a book by Dr Seel submitted for publication in 2015.

About the presenter:

Dr Peter B. Seel is Associate Professor in the Department of Journalism and Technical Communication at Colorado State University in the United States and author of Digital Universe (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012). His research and teaching areas include telecommunication, new media technologies, digital television and documentary history & production. His professional background includes positions in photojournalism and television production, including working as a television producer-director for ten years in Sacramento, California. Dr Seel earned his Ph.D. in Telecommunication at Indiana University in 1995.

Date:
Tuesday 4 February 2014
Event type:
Research seminar
Presenter:
Dr Karina Aveyard, School of Film, Television and Media Studies, University of East Anglia, UK
Venue:
ATC 422/423
Time:
1.00-2.00pm
Topic:
Repositioning Cinema in the 21st Century: Multiplexes, Home Viewing and Digital Media

This paper will explore the transformations and futures of cinema and their implications for contemporary media. Cinema is often conceived as separate from media and particularly from media studies. Such distinctions appear increasingly artificial when considered against the rapid shifts in the circulation and consumption of audiovisual content. In attempting to broaden critical thinking around this topic, this paper will suggest that cinema might be productively reconsidered as something not only integrally connected with, but also sustained by, wider media landscapes

This seminar will drawing on findings from recent European research, including data on the usage and preference for different audiovisual screens and devices. It will examine debates about the cultural and economic position of film exhibition and consumption; consider the challenges of defining and understanding the socio-cultural practices of audiences; and explore the nature of cinema's key relationships with other media platforms. The conceptual issues to be discussed underpin a pilot study that will be conducted in Norwich, United Kingdom in mid-2014. The parameters of this planned research will form part of the context for the discussion.

About the presenter:

Dr Karina Aveyard is a Lecturer in the School of Film, Television and Media Studies at the University of East Anglia, UK. The research for her PhD, completed at Griffith University in 2012, was funded by an ARC Linkage Grant with partners the National Film and Sound Archive and Screen Australia. Karina is the co-editor of Watching Film: New Perspectives on Movie-Going, Exhibition and Reception (Intellect 2013), and author of forthcoming monograph The Lure of the Big Screen: Cinema in Rural Australia and the UK (Intellect 2014). Her essays have also been published in journals including Continuum, Media International Australia, Participations: Journal of Audience and Reception Studies and Studies in Australasian Cinema.