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The Swinburne Institute 2011 Seminars and Public Lectures


Lunctime Seminars commence at 12.45pm and run for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes. Members of the public are welcome to attend. For more information about the series contact Grace Lee.

Special Seminars and Public Lectures are held at a variety of times and locations across the university and off-campus. Please check the details listed below carefully. A common location is the Australian Graduate School of Management lecture theatre AGSE 207. For directions to this theatre please click here: Transport and Location Map. Members of the public are welcome to attend. For more information about the series contact the Swinburne Institute via email or on 03 9214 8825.

Seminars from previous years are archived here.

Podcasts of the series are available at ItunesU

Lunchtime Seminar Series

Date:
Wednesday, 2 March
Venue:
BA 202 Hawthorn
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Asylum Seeker Processing in East Timor: A Solution for Whom?
Dr Savitri Taylor (The Swinburne Institute and LaTrobe University) (email)

In July 2010, Prime Minister Julia Gillard publicly floated the possibility of establishing a Regional Processing Centre in East Timor to which actual or potential irregular maritime arrivals to Australia could be taken to have their asylum claims determined.  In November 2010, the Australian government provided East Timor with a confidential paper entitled the "Regional Assessment Centre Concept" which sets out in considerable detail its proposal and the supposed benefits thereof.  The paper has since been leaked.  In this seminar, Dr Taylor will critique the claims contained in the paper about the potential benefits and beneficiaries of the proposed Centre.

Date:
Wednesday, 9 March
Venue:
AGSE202
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Federal and Provincial Immigration Policy and Housing Outcomes
Prof Tom Carter (University of Winnepeg) (email)

Federal and Provincial governments in Canada have been pursuing a proactive immigration policy for more than a decade. High levels of immigration have become a major component of population growth both nationally and in Canada’s major metropolitan centres. Policy strategies throughout the country have focused on the attraction and retention of skilled economic immigrants to address labour force needs. However, Canada continues to respect humanitarian objectives by accepting significant numbers of refugees. The two groups, economic immigrants and refugees, have very different housing needs and experience different housing outcomes. The presentation highlights immigration trends and policies at the federal and provincial levels and illustrates the housing experiences and outcomes of the two groups. The intersection between immigration and housing policy and housing policy implications are discussed.

Tom Carter is currently Professor of Geography at the University of Winnipeg. Dr Carter has just completed a seven year term as Canada Research Chair in Urban Change and Adaptation under the Canada Research Chair’s Program. Prior to becoming the Research Chair Dr Carter was Director of Urban and Regional Research at the University’s Institute of Urban Studies. Before joining the University in 1985, Dr Carter was Executive Director of the Research and Policy Development Division with the Saskatchewan Housing Corporation. He held various positions in research and program delivery with the Housing Corporation in the period 1974 to 1985. Dr Carter has worked as a consultant in the housing and planning fields and has lectured in Geography, Housing, Urban Studies, and City Planning at the Universities of Brandon, Regina, Manitoba and currently Winnipeg.

Dr Carter has been an affiliated researcher with the Metropolis Project since its inception fourteen years ago. His work with Metropolis focuses on the settlement experiences of refugees and immigrants, particularly their housing experience. His work on housing, neighbourhood change, inner city revitalization, immigration and community development has a strong social policy focus with an emphasis on improving the quality of life of marginalized populations, particularly those living in inner city neighbourhoods.

Dr Carter has been actively involved in program evaluation and policy development for all three levels of government and has chaired or served on a number of task forces and commissions focusing on housing policy and community revitalization issues. He works extensively with community based organizations and his work in building community capacity and strengthening neighbourhoods was recognized in 2003 when the University of Winnipeg awarded him the Marsha Hanen Award for Excellence in Creating Community Awareness. In 2005 he was awarded the Clarence Atchinson Award for Excellence in Community Service by the University of Winnipeg. Also in 2005, the Prairie Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers presented Dr Carter with the John. H. Warkentin Award for Scholarly Contributions to the Geography of the Western Canada for his work on inner city neighbourhoods and housing.

Date:
Wednesday, 23 March
Venue:
ATC522
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Through the eye of the video camera. Violence, melodrama and the representation of Nigerian reality
Alessandro Jedlowski (University of Naples) (email)

The Nigerian video industry emerged in the last fifteen years as one of the largest film industries in the world, and the largest in the African continent. After a general introduction to the history and the economy of the industry and to the narrative and aesthetic genres that define the films it produces, this presentation analyses the way video films represent the Nigerian reality. Most of the videos portray this reality as one dominated by violence and melodramatic intrigue, in which the main characters live a life of suspicion and fear. How can we read this representation and what use can we make of the content that the videos offer to us to understand the reality of the Nigerian society?

Date:
Wednesday, 6 April
Venue:
ATC522
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Australia Day and Migration: Political Memories and the Social Faultline of Belonging
Olaf Kleist (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

In memories of Australia Day, the arrival of the First Fleet marks, among other things, the beginning of European and later non-European migration to Australia, as well as the origin of a modern Australian society, one which has long been sceptical of new-comers. This tension has made Australia Day an uneasy national commemoration that is politically contested since its early days, but that it is also a representation of Australia’s political culture and a convenient tool for the incorporation of migrants.
This lecture will look at the history of Australia Day to discern how this country perceives of itself in relation to migrants and along the way, to develop a concept of political memories. The presentation will be divided into two parts. First it will reflect on how in the first half of the nineteenth century, Australia Day became two commemorations in one which is representative of two forms of political memory and belonging, civic and cultural. Moreover, it will be argued that this division in the perception of the past and in the imagination of belonging was formative of Australia’s political culture and conditioned political debates about migration. The second part of the presentation will focus on the government’s utilisation of Australia Day for the incorporation of migrants after World War Two. It will focus on the transformation in the relationship between the two forms of political memory used: emphasising civic belonging in the 1950s and 1960s and communal belonging in the 1980s and 1990s. Overall, it will be argued, the analysis of political memories in relation to migration can help us understand Australia’s ‘social faultline, the political divide of two modes of belonging.

Date:
Wednesday, 20 April
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Cyber Wars / Info Wars – computers and the war machine
Dr Douglas Hoey (Swinburne University of Technology) (email)

When in December 2010 services to the Wikileaks organisation were withdrawn by Amazon, Paypal, Visa, the Swedish government and  Swiss banks,  their websites became subject to extensive hacker attacks. This prompted cyberlibertatian John Perry Barlow to twitter: 'The first serious infowar is now engaged. The field of battle is WikiLeaks. You are the troops'. This call to arms was given further urgency by speculation in The Jerusalem Post that the Stuxnet Internet worm was a joint Israeli/ US project that had disabled up to 1000 centrifuges at Iran's Natanz nuclear facility. The scope of the engagement was further extended by Alfred McCoy's widely read online article Taking Down America which contained a scenario of Chinese supercomputers able to disable US missile defences in little over a decade.  Reports of the beginning of cyber war became widespread.

Investigation, however, revealed that the 'anonymous' group behind the DDoS attacks, with their penchant for Guy Fawkes masks, Rick Astley, and Japanese anime, were more cyber pranksters than warriors. Also, while The Jerusalem Post's speculation was sourced from the murky world of secret services and disinformation, McCoy’s article was an exercise in futurology rather than the campaign map for World War Three. Cyber war seems to have ended with a whimper when in late January 2011 IT security firms recommended computer users respond by upgrading from Internet Explorer 6 rather than beginning to duct tape windows.

This is not to dismiss the use of computer networks for military objectives. Nor the existence of Internet worms, hacker groups and cyber activism. Instead, using Gilles Deleuze's concepts of the war machine and processes of capture and resistance, this paper explains these events as garbled dispatches from another cyber war.  A conflict internal to computing over what the technology is for and who controls it. It is argued that this struggle has always existed within computing and is the dynamic which has both driven the development of the computer and continues to shape its evolution.

Date:
Wednesday, 4 May
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Meaningful Participation: Current Trends in Research and Evaluation of Communication for Development
Prof Jo Tacchi (RMIT) (email)

Professor Jo Tacchi is Deputy Dean of Research in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT University, and a Centre Fellow in the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation. She trained as an anthropologist in the UK.  Her research is mostly concerned with media, communication and development. She also has a long standing interest in media and affect, participatory content creation, and the role of radio and new audio technologies in domestic spaces. Jo has developed methodologies that combine ethnographic principles with action research cycles and is the co-author of Action Research and New Media published in 2009 by Hampton Press. Her current work, mostly in South Asia, explores issues of voice and participation in relation to information and communication technologies (ICT), media and development.

Date:
Wednesday, 18 May
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

What’s my name again? Researchers, their work and their names
Ms Dana McKay and Ms Rebecca Parker (Swinburne University of Technology - Library) (email)

Researchers’ names are like brand names for their work, however unlike brand names researchers’ names are neither unique nor unchanging. This variability affects reputation, funding, and finding good work. Dana McKay and Rebecca Parker discuss the approach of researchers to their own names and the names of others.

Date:
Wednesday, 1 June
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

A charter for children's learning: the hospital as a learning space
Dr Tsharni Zazryn and Dr Liza Hopkins (Royal Children’s Hospital Education Institute) email)

Children’s hospitals are in a unique position to attend to children’s spontaneous connection with learning as a dimension of health and wellbeing.  Dr Tsharni Zazryn and Dr Liza Hopkins will discuss the ways in which The Royal Children’s Hospital Education Institute is re-imagining the health care environment as learning space.

Date:
Wednesday, 15 June
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Between Reconciliation and Forgiveness: Towards Cosmopolitanism of the Nodal City of Gdańsk in Paweł Huelle’s Castorp
A-Prof Ania Spyra (Butler University in Indianapolis) (email)

After the borders of Poland were re-drawn following the end of WWII, the city of Danzig became Gdańsk again. While the postwar Soviet-influenced communist governments hoped to erase the traces of German presence in the city, their hope of a total erasure of German history not only did not work but rather made the task of reimagining Gdańsk's past all the more imperative for the writers who have lived there. Because they grew up noticing the ubiquity of German traces left unexplained by the postwar official history, these writers opposed the artificial idea of pure Polishness propagated by the government, and proposed instead a more cosmopolitan, inclusive view of a multicultural composition of every nation.

In this presentation, I will use the example of the Gdańsk writer Paweł Huelle’s 2004 novel Castorp - a postcolonial re-writing of Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain which engages with both the uncomfortable issues of social memory and historical justice and the cosmopolitan tradition of world literature that connects Poland and Germany - to talk about the continuing debates around such reconciliatory politics in Poland. Drawing on Jacques Derrida's lectures On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness, especially on the distinction he makes between reconciliation and forgiveness, I will argue that the novel's pervasive postcolonial perspective offers not an accusation or a nationalist re-reading of the past but a complex review of overlapping identities that cannot be reduced to a dialectics of German-Polish relations.

Date:
Wednesday, 22 June
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Home Internet for Remote Indigenous communities
Dr Ellie Rennie and Prof Julian Thomas (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

The NBN will facilitate the digital delivery of e-services, including e-health and e-education, to all Australians. Many remote Indigenous communities, however, currently have very little access to the internet and make little use of it. This presentation will discuss barriers and needs in relation to home internet in remote Indigenous communities, drawing on our ACCAN-funded study of 3 communities in central Australia (conducted with the Centre for Appropriate Technology and the Central Land Council). The seminar will also outline our forthcoming ARC-funded longitudinal study in this area, which will investigate the long-term issues involved with take-up and use across social, technological, economic and cultural domains.

Date:
Friday, June 29
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Matters of the Heart
Prof Klaus Neumann (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

In this special seminar, The Swinburne Institute research professor Klaus Neumann will discuss the recent SBS television series Go back to where you came from as well as responses to that series. Could or should this television event influence Australia's response to refugees and asylum seekers?

Klaus Neumann is the author of the award-winning Refuge Australia: Australia's Humanitarian Record and of numerous articles on refugee and asylum seeker policy.

Date:
Wednesday, 10 August
Venue:
ATC 520
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Temporary migration and its implications for Australian democracy
Peter Mares (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

Although Australia does not have large numbers of undocumented migrants like the US and Europe, about 10% of the Australian workforce now consists of long-term 'temporary' migrants. That these people may study, work, and pay tax for years at a time without engagement in the political process raises questions about social cohesion, social engagement and the future of Australian multiculturalism.

Date:
Wednesday, 17 August
Venue:
AGSE210
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

The Struggle for Digital Children's Television in Australia 2000-2010
Dr Leonie Rutherford (Deakin University)

This paper contextualises the ten-year struggle to establish terrestrial digital children's public service broadcasting in Australia. It traces the campaign for the development of the new digital children's channel (ABC3) from its initial stages as an initiative of the Australian Children's Television Foundation (ACTF), to its adoption as a legitimation strategy for the ABC.

Date:
Wednesday, 24 August
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Wrong Winner Elections – Australia and the US
Ms Jennifer Newton-Farrelly (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

Wrong Winner elections are those where a party wins the support of a majority of voters but another party wins government. They show that our electoral structures don't deliver the outcomes we want, but what do we need to fix - gerrymandering or good campaigns?

Date:
Wednesday, 21 September
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

The National Youth Commission
A/Prof David MacKenzie (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

In April 2008, Minister Tanya Plibersek and former Human Rights Commissioner Brian Burdekin launched Australia's Homeless Youth, the report of the National Youth Commission Inquiry into Youth Homelessness (NYC). In this seminar, Associate Professor David Mackenzie, one of the four NYC commissioners, will reflect on the Inquiry and what it achieved.

Date:
Wednesday, 5 October
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Homelessness Prevention for Women and Children who have experienced domestic and family violence: Innovations in policy and practice
Dr Angela Spinney (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

The 2008 Federal White Paper on homelessness, The road home, specifically identified and promoted the need to develop and expand programs that allow women and children to remain in the home once a domestic violence perpetrator has been removed. This seminar investigates innovations in policy and practice that seek to meet this aim

Date:
Wednesday, 19 October
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Advertising in the BRICs nations
Professor John Sinclair (University of Melbourne) (email)

The once fundamental distinction between the ‘developed’ and the ‘developing’ nations of the world has been thrown into disarray by the rapid economic growth and social change exhibited over the last decade by Brazil, Russia, India, and China.  In spite of their obvious and very considerable differences in geographical attributes, economic base, historical and political formation, and not to mention sociocultural composition, these countries have become united in contemporary business press discourse under the acronym BRICs.  One of the major features of this apparent unity is the growth of their national markets for consumer goods and services, usually seen in conjunction with the rise of an ostensible ‘middle class’ in each country.  Such a development implies a key role being played by marketing in general and advertising in particular in the making of BRICs, and indeed, all these nations are now amongst the world’s largest advertising markets.  This paper will identify and examine the stakeholders involved in driving the growth of these consumer markets – the advertisers, the advertising agencies, and the media.  Particular attention will be paid to the issue of how national and global interests coalesce in such settings, and how this relation can be discerned in actual marketing campaigns, including the role of branding, product type, and product-market adaptations.  By looking at the national or global affiliation of the largest advertisers, the agencies which capture most of their business, and the most preferred of the popular media for advertising, a profile will be built up of each market.  Of particular interest is the effect which the organisation of advertising has upon media development in these nations.  In these ways, the BRICs nations can be examined on the basis of their more nuanced differences, as well as being compared for their gross similarities, as is most usually the case. 

Date:
Wednesday, 26 October
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

The Cultural Economy of Locative Media
Rowan Wilken (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

This presentation explores the emergence and growing significance of locative media services. Questions of location and location-awareness are becoming increasingly central to our contemporary engagements with the internet and mobile media. Collectively referred to as 'locative media' (broadly speaking, media of communication functionally bound to a location), these technologies are now well-established and continuing to boom commercially with consumers accustomed to using sat nav devices, Google maps on desktops and laptops and mobile devices, geoweb and geotagging applications, all sorts of location and mapping technologies on mobiles, and various location-aware apps on smartphones. Despite growing academic interest in location-based services, there is little systematic account of the various locative media services that specifically details in depth their cultural-economic dimensions. Focusing on Google's Places API and the locative mobile social software service Foursquare, what this seminar presentation seeks to explore, then, are how location-based services are culturally and economically shaped, and what implications this has for new media research and media economics.

Date:
Wednesday, 2 November
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

How Reference to Viruses and Bacteria Can Help Understanding Colonialism and Settler Colonialism
Dr Lorenzo Veracini (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

A growing body of literature has characterised settler colonial phenomena as "distinct", and called for the establishment of dedicated interpretative tools (see, for example, Stasiulis, Yuval-Davis 1995, Wolfe 1999, Russell 2001, Pearson 2001, Elkins, Pedersen 2005, Pateman 2007, Goldstein, Lubin 2008, Belich 2009, Ford 2010, Banivanua-Mar, Edmonds 2010; Veracini 2010, Bateman, Pilkington, 2011, and settler colonial studies, a newly established academic journal). "Distinct", however, begs the question: distinct relative to "what" (see Sovereign 2011)? This paper reflects in a necessarily provisional way on this distinctiveness. It heuristically suggests that reference to the diverse functioning of viral and bacterial phenomena can help understanding the distinct operation of colonial and settler colonial systems. While both viruses and bacteria are exogenous elements that often dominate their destination locales, viruses need living cells to operate, while bacteria attach to surfaces and may or may not rely on the organisms they encounter (for a definition of colonialism as primarily characterised by exogenous domination, see, Horvath 1972). Similarly, while both colonisers and settler colonisers are exogenous elements that assert their dominance over their destination locales, a colonial system of relationships, unlike a settler colonial one, is premised on the presence and subjugation of exploitable "Others" (see Wolfe 1999). This paper also suggests that this metaphorical conceptualisation can facilitate reflection on the decolonisation of settler colonial forms.

Date:
Wednesday, 23 November
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

All That Goes To Ground: Reflections on writing a memoir of Werner Pelz
Dr Roger Averill (The Swinburne Institute) (email)

This talk will reflect on the process of my researching and writing a book about Werner Pelz - 'Dunera Boy', farm labourer, vicar, theologian, Guardian columnist, BBC broadcaster, author, sociologist, teacher, friend. It will raise questions about the nature of life writing. For example, is it possible to write a life that is both honest and honouring? What roles do enchantment and disenchantment play in the biographical impulse and its practice? How can I, someone who has lived in the comfort and stability of late 20th and early 21st centuries Australia, hope to understand the experiences of someone who grew up in the tumult and uncertainty of 1920s and 1930s Berlin? Does it matter that my experiences of Werner as a teacher and friend colour the way I render his experiences? Can the spirit of a life be conveyed through depictions and explications of key episodes, or is the biographer condemned to a false notion of comprehensiveness?

The talk will also touch on some of the recurring themes and tensions in Werner's life: exile and marginality, imagination and 'reality', the limits of understanding, issues of hope and disillusionment. (Is all hope an illusion, its disappointment, disillusionment?) In discussing these matters I will trace my quest to make meaning of a life intensely lived in the creation and questioning of meaning.

Roger Averill wrote a PhD thesis entitled, Social Lives: Belief, (Auto)Biography and the Sociological Imagination. More recently he published a memoir, Boy He Cry: An Island Odyssey and a novel, Keeping Faith. He received a State Library of Victoria Creative Fellowship to assist him in researching the life of Werner Pelz and is currently an adjunct of the ISR.

Date:
Monday, 28 November 2011
Venue:
St Michael's Church, Waratah Room, Level 1, 120 Collins Street, Melbourne.
Time:
10.00am - 12 noon
Description:

Community Investment and Community empowerment: The role of social housing providers
Prof David Mullins, (University of Birmingham)

Swinburne Institute and bankmecu in collaboration with PowerHousing Australia and Community Housing Federation of Victoria have pleasure in inviting you to a presentation by David Mullins, Professor of Housing Policy at the School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham.

In this 2 hour presentation, David considers a range of questions that when analysed, can be used to develop a tool for housing organisations to position their work on community investment and community empowerment issues:

  • Is community investment about distributing surpluses to good causes to demonstrate social responsibility, or about raising funding to support community-led initiatives?
  • What motivates community investment and how do motivations differ between housing organisations and community groups?
  • How do community investment activities relate to the core housing business of social landlords?
  • Is community empowerment about delegation or control? Can mutual engagement overcome power imbalances between housing organisations and community groups?
  • Does community investment lead to community empowerment? And if so, how do we know?

David Mullins leads the Service Delivery and Housing streams in the Third Sector Research Centre [TSRC] at University of Birmingham. His research includes governance, management and regulation of housing, housing need and homelessness and social enterprises in public service delivery.


For more information, visit the website for access to the Community Investment and Community Empowerment

Date:
Wednesday, 30 November
Venue:
Library Conference Room
Time:
12.45-2.00 pm
Description:

Schools as Community Hubs - Analysing Recent Australian Developments in Shared Schools
Dr Ian McShane (email)

In Australia and internationally, there is increasing interest in making more effective use of schools as community hubs. Investment in shared school facilities aims to engage parents and local communities in schooling, to coordinate educational and community services, and to encourage civic participation. In this seminar I will analyse recent Australian developments in this area and discuss some conceptual and practical questions associated with shared schools.

Dr Ian McShane is a research fellow at the Swinburne Institute, Swinburne University of Technology. With fellow researchers Professor Denise Meredyth and Assoc Professor Jerry Watkins, he holds an ARC Linkage award to research community engagement in the planning, use and governance of shared school facilities.




Special Seminars

Public Policy and Leadership in a 2.0 World

Speaker:
Sir John Elvidge
Date:
Monday, 7 March 2011
Venue:
EN213 - Hawthorn Campus
Time:
12.30-1.30 pm
Description:

The Centre for Leadership and Public Interest and the The Swinburne Institute, with the support of the Faculty of Life and Social Sciences and Faculty of Business & Enterprise, present a timely reflection by Sir John Elvidge on the contemporary challenges of public policy and leadership.

The dynamics of open-source democracy, 2.0 government, Wikileaks, Twitter-based diplomacy, minority governments, communitarianism, and citizen-based journalism etc are changing and challenging the way public policy is developed and delivered.

In this seminar,  Sir John will address contemporary issues such as how leaders and policy makers are confronted with an increasingly complex landscape: an information revolution more disruptive and impactful than the industrial revolution; the growing inter-connectedness of both global and local issues; the challenges of government being more transparent and more engaged with its citizenry; the changing demands on the public sector; the rise of collaborative leadership with minority governments; the challenges of attracting and developing leaders.

Sir John Elvidge is one of Europe’s most respected and experienced policy-makers. He was Permanent Secretary of the Scottish Government from 2003 until his retirement last year, after almost 40 years in the United Kingdom Civil Service.
As Permanent Secretary he was responsible for the budget of the Scottish Government (£35 billion in 2010-2011), overall management responsibility for 15,000 civil servants, and joint responsibility with other permanent secretaries for management of the UK Civil Service as a whole. In this role he had a particular responsibility for leading work on leadership development.

Sir John played a key role in the devolution of government functions from Westminster to the Scottish, Northern Ireland and Welsh Governments. He also led to structural reform of the Scottish Civil Service, abolishing department structures and organising the Civil Service around outcomes.

On his visit to Australia, Sir John’s key engagements are with the Centre for Leadership and Public Interest at Swinburne University, the CPA Australia International Public Sector Convention, and the Victorian Leadership Development Centre.

Participatory democracy in the age of the Tea Party

Speaker:
Dr Jeffrey Minson (University of California San Diego)
Date:
Thursday, 3 March
Venue:
Sospeso Cafe (Google Map | PDF local Map)
Time:
4.00-6.00 pm
Bookings:
Required (via email)
Description:

What lessons might the prehistory, emergence and current success of the tea party movement hold with respect to established ways of thinking about the active participatory component of citizenship in theoretical talk about citizenship?

Jeffrey Minson does comparative-descriptive research in the ethics (including moral psychologies) of politics and government, with reference to their civil and rhetorical components. His publications include a study of Michel Foucault, a co-edited collection on cultural policy, and a book of essays on questions of conduct pertaining to citizenship, from sexual harassment law to the demands of democratic participation. His most recent research has been concerned with ethics and jurisprudence of state sovereignty, and with Francois Flahault’s project for a cross-disciplinary ‘general anthropology’.

Masterclass with Ted Nelson - The computer world could be completely different

Speaker:
Ted Nelson (Founding designer, Project Xanadu)
Date:
Tuesday, 5 April
Venue:
EW 302 Hawthorn Campus
Time:
12.45-2.30 pm
Bookings:
Required (via email)
Download
Flyer
Description:

What lessons might the prehistory, emergence and current success of the tea party movement hold with respect to established ways of thinking about the active participatory component of citizenship in theoretical talk about citizenship?

Jeffrey Minson does comparative-descriptive research in the ethics (including moral psychologies) of politics and government, with reference to their civil and rhetorical components. His publications include a study of Michel Foucault, a co-edited collection on cultural policy, and a book of essays on questions of conduct pertaining to citizenship, from sexual harassment law to the demands of democratic participation. His most recent research has been concerned with ethics and jurisprudence of state sovereignty, and with Francois Flahault’s project for a cross-disciplinary ‘general anthropology’.

Public Lectures

Global Perspectives on Media Piracy: An evening of public lectures from Joe Karaganis (Social Science Research Council, New York) and Ravi Sundaram (Sarai/Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi)

Date:
Thursday, 24 March
Venue:
Village Roadshow Theatrette, State Library of Victoria (enter
via 179 La Trobe St) (Google Map | PDF local Map)
Time:
6.00 - 8.00 pm
Description:

The Swinburne Institute, Swinburne University of Technology and the ARC Centre of Excellence in Creative Industries and Innovation present an evening of public lectures by Joe Karaganis (Social Science Research Council, New York) and Ravi Sundaram (Sarai/Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi) on the topic of media piracy and informal economies.

Media Piracy In Emerging Economies: Joe Karaganis
This presentation will introduce a major collaborative study of music, film, and software piracy conducted in India, Brazil, South Africa, Russia, and Mexico between 2007 and 2010. The study focuses on the relationship between the licit and illicit media markets in these countries, and on the emergence of enforcement as a primary concern of the knowledge economy.

Joe Karaganis is Media, Technology and Culture program director at the Social Science Research Council in New York. His work focuses on changes in the organization of cultural production in the digital context and on the intersection between information policy and social practice. He is editor of the collection Structures of Participation in Digital Culture (SSRC, 2007).

Postcolonial Media After The Informal: Ravi Sundaram
Informality has arrived on the postcolonial media landscape with a kinetic force in the last two decades. More media is now distributed through bazaars, small markets, street vendors and neighbourhood retail that ever before. Informality is seen as a threat by large media industries, who see it as distributing pirate media or simply indifferent to the Law of Property. Informality, once a grey zone of paralegal production and work for economists, now presents media research with a series of new research questions. What are the stakes for media after the informal? What is the relationship between the practices of postcolonial informality and the larger landscape of new media? Is there a connection between the street market and the world after Wikileaks? This lecture will suggest that we are entering a new media condition today that may disrupt many of the received models of cultural modernity of the last 100 years.

Ravi Sundaram is a Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi and Co-Director of the Sarai programme on media and urban culture. He is the author of Pirate Modernity: Delhi's Media Urbanism (Routledge, 2009).

Respondents: Stuart Cunningham (ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, QUT), Kathy Bowrey (Faculty of Law, UNSW), Julian Thomas (The Swinburne Institute).

More information contact Dr Ramon Lobato via email or phone(03) 9214 8637

The computer world could be completely different- Ted Nelson:Founding designer, Project Xanadu

Date:
Monday 4 April
Venue:
Village Roadshow Theatrette, State Library of Victoria (enter
via 179 La Trobe St) (Google Map | PDF local Map)
Time:
7.00 - 9.00 pm
Contacts
Email isradmin@swin.edu.au for more information or for bookings indicating the number of tickets required
Description:

Swinburne University of Technology, the Swinburne Institute for Social Research, and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, present a public lecture based on information that . . .

Swinburne University of Technology, the Swinburne Institute for Social Research, and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, present a public lecture based on information that . . .

“the computer world could be completely different”

Fish, they say, aren't aware of water. Most people, including computer scientists, don't notice the hidden assumptions and traditions that have structured today's computer world and digital documents. These assumptions push the real problems into the laps of users and programmers.  Almost nobody notices the consequences of this locked cosmology.  While there is no right or wrong computer world; what is wrong is that there is only one computer world, with no other choices.

We will consider some alternatives.

Theodor Holm Nelson is an American designer, generalist, and pioneer of information technology. He coined the terms "hypermedia" and "hypertext" in 1963, and is also credited with first use of the words micropayment, transclusion, virtuality, intertwingularity and dildonics.  He is the most important computing visionary of our time.  The main thrust of his work has been to create a different kind of electronic document which allows many forms of connection, instead of the "paper simulation" of Word, PDF and the World Wide Web. Nelson founded Project Xanadu in 1960, a project that has inspired a whole generation of computer programmers, hobbyists and developers. The effort is documented in his 1974 book Computer Lib/Dream Machines and the 1981 Literary Machines. He has just published an autobiography, Possiplex.

Book Launch - Making Settler Colonial Space: Perspectives on Race, Place and Identity (Palgrave UK, 2010) Tracey Banivanua Mar and Penelope Edmonds (eds)
To be launched by Patrick Wolfe

Date:
Thursday 30th June
Venue:
Gertrudes Brown Couch, 30 Gertrude Street, Fitzroy
Time:
5.00 - 5.30 pm
RSVP:
Penny Edmonds at edmondsp@unimelb.edu.au or 90358879
Drinks and snacks will be provided at the bar.
Description:

Making Settler Colonial Space charts the making of colonial spaces in settler colonies of the Pacific Rim during the last two centuries. Contributions journey through time, place and region, and piece together interwoven but discrete studies that illuminate transnational and local experiences - violent, ideological, and cultural - that produced settler-colonial space.

This unique collection of essays explores the conflicted, contested and shared histories that produced spaces of belonging and exile in colonies of settlement around the Pacific rim including Australia, Aotearoa New Zealand, and British Columbia. Each contribution explores the thematic question of how the unique societies that developed from British settler-colonialism made and continue to make the spaces they occupy. In essays and poems, authors explore the spatial legacies of contact between Indigenous peoples and newcomers in a fascinating journey that takes readers from snowy deserts to emerging urban landscapes, and from census data to contemporary Indigenous music scenes. Collectively the essays offer a rich social history of the gridded, patchworked and layered visages that make up today's settler-colonial space. (Cover image 'Billabong' courtesy artist Trevor Nickolls).

A new scholarly journal will also be introduced by Lorenzo Veracini and Jane Carey

Settler colonial studies

settler colonial studies understands settler colonialism as a global and transnational phenomenon, and as much a thing of the past as a thing of the present. There is no such thing as neo-settler colonialism or post-settler colonialism because settler colonialism is a resilient formation that rarely ends. Not all migrants are settlers; settlers are founders of political orders who carry with them a distinct sovereign capacity. And settler colonialism is not colonialism: settlers want Indigenous people to vanish (but can make use of their labour before they are made to disappear). Sometimes settler colonial forms operate within colonial ones, sometimes they subvert them, sometimes they replace them. But even if colonialism and settler colonialism interpenetrate and overlap, they remain separate as they co-define each other.


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